Our office opens regular office hours during COVID-19 Emergency.

Personal injuries can vary significantly in terms of severity. In car crashes and other types of accidents in Poway and throughout Southern California, people can suffer harm that ranges from a mild injury to a debilitating or even fatal injury. According to the Cambridge Dictionary, the word ‘catastrophic’ often means “causing sudden and very great harm or destruction.” In the realm of personal injury law, we often think of catastrophic injuries as those that result in disabilities and those that may be life-threatening. The following are examples of different kinds of catastrophic injuries that often lead to successful personal injury lawsuits. 

Spinal Cord Injuries (SCIs)

Spinal cord injuries frequently result in permanent paralysis. According to the Mayo Clinic, a spinal cord injury is a term that refers to “damage to any part of the spinal cord or nerves at the end of the spinal canal.” Even if a spinal cord injury does not result in paralysis, the Mayo Clinic underscores that these types of injuries frequently cause “permanent changes in strength, sensation, and other body functions below the site of the injury.” In addition, these injuries can require medical support for the rest of the injured person’s life, costing hundreds of thousands of dollars (and often much more).

When teenagers begin driving in Escondido, the experience can be extremely stressful for parents—both as passengers in the front seat and as nervous figures waiting at home for a teenager to return safely with the car. According to an article in Forbes, parent anxiety might not be helping teenagers at all when it comes to reducing the rate of car accidents. Rather than feeling nervous about having your teen behind the wheel, it is better to take steps to combat your anxieties surrounding your child obtaining a driver’s license and to focus on rational tasks that can provide your teen driver with the safety training they need to stay safe on the road.

Teen Driving is Dangerous

Parents’ anxieties surrounding teen driving are not unfounded. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that, on average, six teenagers between the ages of 16 and 19 die every day in a motor vehicle collision, and as many as 300,000 teens require treatment in emergency departments every year for car accident injuries. Yet, as the CDC underscores and the Forbes article emphasizes, teen driving collisions are preventable.

If you are planning to stay at a hotel in San Marcos or elsewhere in Southern California, you should be able to expect that the hotel will maintain the premises in a reasonably safe manner, and that you will not be exposed to unreasonable risks of harm or injury. However, in the era of COVID-19 and the coronavirus pandemic, the idea of being reasonably safe in a hotel environment has shifted. Many people still want to travel within California, and others want to plan vacations to Southern California from other parts of the country. Ultimately, if you stay at a hotel where you contract COVID-19, can you file a negligence claim against the hotel?

 
This is a complicated question, and it ultimately depends upon a number of different factors. We will provide you with some clarifying information below, but it is important to speak with a hotel negligence attorney in San Marcos to determine whether or not you have a claim.

 
Was the Hotel Negligent in Failing to Prevent the Spread of the Coronavirus?

Slips and falls can happen in many different ways and for many different reasons in and around Encinitas. Whether you got hurt in a slip and fall accident due to a liquid spill at a restaurant, or your child suffered a concussion in a slip and fall injury on a pool deck at a Southern California hotel, it is important to speak with an experienced Encinitas personal injury lawyer to learn more about your options for filing a claim for financial compensation. Yet you may be concerned that your own fault could prevent you from obtaining compensation after a slip and fall. For example, you might be thinking, “Even though that restaurant or grocery store did not clean up the liquid spill on the floor that caused my injuries, I was distracted because I was walking while texting on my smartphone.” Or, for instance, you might be wondering, “If my child slipped on a slick area of a hotel walkway, is the hotel still liable even if my child was running at the time?”

 
Here is what you need to keep in mind: California uses a “pure comparative fault” rule when it comes to determining damages in a personal injury claim, which is beneficial for plaintiffs who may be partially at fault. However, you should also know that, even if the possibility of your own fault is raised, you may be able to show that you are not responsible for your injuries. The following are steps you should take if you are concerned you are partially at fault for a slip and fall injury in Encinitas or elsewhere in Southern California.

 
Document the Scene Where the Slip and Fall Happened

Just because the coronavirus pandemic has shifted much thinking about safety in Southern California to issues of virus containment does not mean pedestrian safety and car accident prevention should lose consideration. Putting the two public health issues together—COVID-19 prevention and pedestrian safety—some cities in California have started to install touch-free crosswalk signals to ensure that pedestrians and bicyclists do not avoid using traffic safety signals in order to avoid risk of exposure to the coronavirus.

 
It is important for pedestrians and bicyclists to understand ways of staying safe and avoiding motor vehicle collisions, and it is also critical to understand how comparative fault can reduce a pedestrian or bicyclist’s damages award if they do not abide by traffic rules.

 
How Touch-Free Pedestrian and Bicyclist Signals can Help to Prevent Intersection Accidents

Whether you are on the road heading to or from work, or you are driving up the California coast with your family for a weekend vacation, you should know that some types of accidents tend to happen more often in the summer than during other months. Winter weather collisions are not typically an issue in Southern California given that the weather is temperate year-round, but many of the summer and warm-weather accident hazards that exist throughout the country are certainly present in San Diego County and throughout the state in the summer. Travelers Insurance identifies some of the most common causes of car crashes from June through September. The following are tips for avoiding a summer auto accident.

 

  1. High Temperatures can Pose Dangers to Your Vehicle

 
High temperatures can wreak havoc on an automobile if it is not regularly and properly maintained. For example, if tires are underinflated and the weather is particularly hot, you could be at risk of a tire blowout while you are driving. Engines can also be at increased risk of overheating during the summer. Most of the vehicle-related risks that come with hot weather can be avoided if you have your vehicle serviced regularly.

Learning about the claims process after sustaining an injury in Oceanside can be confusing. How do you file a claim, and do you need to hire a lawyer? For most personal injury lawsuits in Southern California, it is extremely beneficial to work with an experienced injury attorney. Yet finding the best attorney for your case will require you to schedule consultations and to speak with lawyers about your situation. When you do, it is important to ask certain questions to make sure you hire the best personal injury attorney for your Oceanside case. The following are some tips to help you find experienced legal counsel.

 
Ask the Lawyer About Experience in Personal Injury Law

 
You should ask any attorney about his or her experience handling personal injury cases. How many years, for example, has the lawyer been practicing? Has the attorney spent his or her entire career in California, working on cases arising under California law? You want to make sure you have an attorney with experience advocating for injured plaintiffs in personal injury cases.

When most of us think of speeding and car accidents, we think about drivers who are traveling at a speed well beyond the posted speed limit and often behaving in other aggressive ways. Yet speeding does not have to mean just driving beyond the posted speed limit. When there is inclement weather or there are poor driving conditions, motorists need to behave reasonably and need to recognize that they owe a duty of care to other drivers and passengers on the road. As such, even if a motorist is traveling at a speed below the posted speed limit, that motorist still may be unlawfully speeding—and thus may be responsible for injuries in an accident—if the speed is too fast to be considered safe for the conditions. 

When Traveling Below the Speed Limit May Still be Speeding

According to California Vehicle Code Section 22350, which is the speeding law in the state, “no person shall drive a vehicle upon a highway at a speed greater than is reasonable or prudent having due regard for weather, visibility, the traffic on, and the surface and width of, the highway, and in no event at a speed which endangers the safety of persons or property.”

When researchers began to develop autonomous vehicles, or self-driving cars, the thinking was that these vehicles could eliminate the element of human error that contributes to so many car accidents in Southern California. Yet in the time that autonomous vehicles have been tested, they have not actually proven to be all that safe. Indeed, in some cases, self-driving cars have resulted in serious and fatal injuries, especially to pedestrians. According to a recent article in California StreetsBlog, a new study conducted by researchers at the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) suggests that autonomous vehicles will likely prevent only about one-third of all motor vehicle collisions in California and across the country.

 
Why are autonomous vehicles so ineffective? Is there a possibility that the technology will improve in the coming years such that self-driving cars will do more to reduce the rates of traffic collisions in California?

 
IIHS Says Identifying Hazards is Not Enough to Prevent Collisions

If you travel by yourself or with your family and book a room at a hotel or motel in San Diego County, what does that hotel owe you when it comes to your health and safety? Generally speaking, hotels and motels owe a duty of care to customers who are staying in the rooms. This duty of care means that the hotel needs to take whatever steps a reasonable person would take to ensure that customers are not exposed to unreasonable risks of injury or illness while staying on the property. Given that we are now living in the era of the coronavirus, it will be particularly important for hotels and motels to provide guests with appropriate safety and health precautions, and that they warn guests about potential hazards on the property. 

There are many different kinds of ways in which hotels and motels can be liable for guest injuries. The following are some examples of common hotel and motel negligence claims.

Slips, Trips, and Falls on Hotel Property

Contact Information